Bacteria living naturally within the gut provide a gateway to gaining wait, according to researchers. The bacteria that is able to take over after being dosed with antibiotics may explain why antibiotics fatten farm animals and possibly people. 

“Researchers mimicked what farmers have been doing for decades to fatten up their livestock: they fed young mice a steady low dose of antibiotics. The antibiotics altered the composition of bacteria in the guts of the mice and also changed how the bacteria broke down nutrients. Just as farm animals get fat, the antibiotic-fed mice put on weight. When researchers rid mice of a gene encoding a gut molecule called lymphotoxin, segmented filamentous bacteria overwhelmed the normal microbial community. These bacteria may gobble up excess fat — the mice remained thin no matter what they ate. “

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